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WHERE "THEY" CAME FROM IN EUROPE


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          As I stated in the overview, Frank Schad Sr. and Adolph Schad Sr. are the first generation to have come to the United States of America. Frank and Adolph were once believed to have come from the town of Moletein, Austria (now Maletin, Czech Republic). In April, 2005, my grandfather Charles Schad and I traveled to the Czech Republic and visited the town of Moletein. We also went to the archives in Olomouc and made a discovery. Our Schads never lived in Moletein. As it turns out, they lived in the towns of Ohrnes (Javorí, Czech Republic) and Wojes (Svojanov, Czech Republic). The churh they attended was in Moletein, so logic would lead one to believe that when asked where they came from, Frank and Adolph said Moletein for this reason.

          After World War II, all of the towns in the present-day Czech Republic that had German names were given Czech names. This fact made it somewhat difficult to locate Moletein. Here are the changes:

GERMAN
CZECH
MoleteinMaletin
TriebendorfTrebarov
WojesSvojanov
OhrnesJavori
RippauRepova
AltstadtStare Mesto
MüglitzMohelnice
BusauBouzov
Irschmann, Irchman, Jerschman, Irmann, JerschmainJerman


          Frank, his wife Theresa (Montag), and their three children Theresa, Frances, and Amelia, left Ohrnes for the United States. They made their way to Bremen, Germany and boarded the SS Oder. The Oder sailed from Bremen to Southampton, England, and then on to New York City, NY. The Schads arrived in America on September 4, 1880. The family then made their way to Cottonwood County, MN, to begin a new life. Adolph howevever, didn't come to the USA with his brother. He stayed in Ohrnes until 1886. Adolph sailed aboard the SS America from Bremen, Germany, to Baltimore Harbor, USA. He arrived there on March 26, 1886. Adolph too set off for Cottonwood County, MN, to begin a new life near family and friends that had already settled in the area. Read more about the ships here.

          Another surname I am researching is Jarmer. The Jarmers lived in the same area as the Schads. John Julius Jarmer was born Triebendorf, Austria (Trebarov, Czech Republic. I found a book about the Moletein parish. It was written in German, but my grandfather had it translated. The book has the surnames of Schad, Montag, Nimmerfroh, Jarmer, and several others that are of interest. Go to the Moletein book page to get this book.

          The area where the various towns the Schads and other related families lived was called the Schönhengstgau. The former country of Czechoslovakia was made up of the present-day countries of the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic. Because my ancestors were from what is now the Czech Republic, I will discuss its history in relation to Czechoslovakia, and when I refer to the Czech Republic, I am referring to the area of Czechoslovakia that corresponds to the present-day Czech Republic. For hundreds of years, the Czech Republic was inhabited by people speaking both the Czech and German languages. Nationalism in this area was not as prevalent as one is accustomed to today. German families would intermarry with Czech families, but there were distinct cultures and traditions. The border regions of the Czech Republic were inhabited primarily by German speaking peoples. The interior regions of the country were inhabited primarily by Czech speaking people. The Czech Republic is divided into two historical regions: Bohemia in the west and Moravia in the east. The Schönhengstgau was an area in northwestern Moravia comprised of German speaking people. It has been referred to as a language island, in that the area surrounding the Schönhengstgau was inhabited by Czech speaking people. The Schönhengstgau was not part of any contiguous German land. In the second picture from the right at the bottom of the page, the Schönhengstgau is marked. The third picture shows the border areas that were inhabited by German speaking people. This land came to be known during World War II as the Sudetenland. The word Sudetenland is a modern word and has no historical significance. The fourth picture shows the breakdown of the Czech Republic into the various regions of Bohemia and Moravia that comprise the present-day country. Bohemia and Moravia were independent kingdoms and various times throughout history. They were also conquered and became parts of other empires.


READ ABOUT WHERE THEY SETTLED




                                           
page last updated:   8/15/2014